Kingfield planners give go-ahead to Poland Spring

Wednesday, August 16, 2006
By Valerie Tucker, Correspondent, Morning Sentinel

KINGFIELD — With dozens of Poland Spring binders, maps, and reams of paper before them, the Planning Board unanimously voted that the company could move to the next step in their plans to build a bottling plant and pumping station.

Earlier on Monday evening, Jonathan Edgerton, a Wright Pierce lead engineer for the multimillion dollar project, promised board members that one last piece of paperwork was being rushed to the meeting to complete the final package.

At 8:45 p.m., he hurried in with the updated map.

The board ended the meeting with the vote of approval after 4 months of meetings and paperwork reviews with engineers, attorneys, and Poland Spring representatives.”We’ve got the traffic report, the state permits, and all of the other documents we required,” chairman David Guernsey said.

The board chose September 13 for the first night of a series of public hearings to review the documents. On Sept. 14, from 7 p. m. to 8 p. m., abutters and the general public can present testimony or make comments.

Guernsey suggested that, at their regular planning board meeting on September 11, they could advise any presenters who might want to combine testimony or streamline the hearing to keep the meetings within a 3-hour limit.

A third date, possibly September 27, will include members of the Androscoggin Valley Council of Governments and will cover water withdrawal issues.

In other news, Evangeline Jordan and sons Lester and Richard presented documents as part of an application to change their go-kart track on the Tufts Pond Road from a private members-only club to a commercial track.

The Jordan family received a permit in 1998 for a private recreational facility. Several years ago, the track began offering summer racing events.

In March, 2005, neighboring property owners filed a formal complaint with selectmen about both the noise levels and the commercial aspects of the track. Petitioners protested that admission charges, cash prizes, and public advertising went beyond the scope of the original sanctions. The Planning Board voted that the owners had exceeded the original recreational permit, leaving track owners with an option to limit attendees by requiring membership in the track’s club.

“That hasn’t gone over very well, and we’d like to change the way we’re taking people in to the events,” Lester Jordan said.

The board requested that the documents be resubmitted to reflect that the track is owned by the Everett and Evangeline Jordan Trust. The board will continue the review until they determine the paperwork is complete and will schedule a public hearing before deciding whether to grant a commercial permit.