Nestles gets to keep taking Michigan water

Defending Water for Life is disappointed but not surprised to see this outcome from the Michigan Court of Appeals:

Why rights-based-ordinances are essential to actual protection: Courts follow laws that regulate environmental damage, they cannot prevent the damage from happening. And Nestle still complains because they’re not taking as much water per minute as they’d like… Here is the article:

Nestle Waters North America had a mixed reaction to an opinion recently issued by the Michigan Court of Appeals. The Court ruled on an appeal by Nestle Waters to a controversial 2003 Mecosta Circuit Court ruling that was in error and would have shuttered its Michigan operations, if upheld, according to the company. The Court stated definitively that the use of water by Nestle Waters is a beneficial use and ruled that the company’s water use at its Stanwood-based Ice Mountain bottling facility could continue. The ruling today keeps nearly 200 employees working at the facility.

The Court’s ruling also supported Nestle Waters’ legal arguments in upholding Michigan’s historic water use laws, which allow for the balanced and reasonable use of water by all parties. The ruling also affirmed the standards of the Michigan Environmental Protection Act (MEPA), as well.

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Brewer hires former code enforcement officer as water superintendent

Let’s keep an eye on this guy.

Rodney Butler, the previous code enforcement office, left to briefly work for Nestle and is now returning to Brewer as the water superintendent.  Let’s all watch to  ensure no sleezy deals go down between the water commodification giant and this nice little city while Butler is in charge.  Here’s the article from the Bangor Daily News:

By Nok-Noi Ricker, BDN Staff
Posted Oct. 21, 2011

BREWER, Maine — Rodney Butler, who departed as the city’s code enforcement officer last month, soon will return as the new water department supervisor, City Manager Steve Bost said.

“We’ve been in the process of looking for a water department supervisor for several months,” he said. “We did a rather extensive search and interestingly all roads eventually led to Rodney Butler.

“We’re very pleased that he is interested in coming back to Brewer,” Bost said.

Butler accepted an engineering position with Poland Springs Water Co. in September and assistant code enforcement officer Ben Breadmore was offered and accepted the code enforcement officer job.

Butler “expressed a strong desire to come back to Brewer and we are confident that he will do an outstanding job,” Bost said.

Rodney replaces Mike Riley, who left in June. His first day back in Brewer will be Nov. 1.

Link to original article: http://bangordailynews.com/2011/10/21/news/bangor/brewer-hires-former-code-enforcement-officer-as-water-superintendent/?ref=latest

Nestle Prepares to Restore Fish Hatchery: Precious Access in Colorado

Inaccessible to general public due to “sensitive habitat,” however Nestle will continue pumping 5 days a week, 8 trucks a day.

DWL believes that this article is a perfect example of the marriage between corporate water miners and state officials.  A comment below the article sums it up nicely: “On one hand, Nestle says they want to “create a more natural habitat.” On the other, they want to apply a “geotextile liner” to the ponds. Do the terms “geotextile liner” and “natural habitat” even belong in the same discussion? Just wondrin…”

Here is the article, published in The Mountain Mail on 9/30/2011 by Cailey McDermott:

Nestlé Waters North America, Inc., will request a permit to restore the old fish hatchery near Ruby Mountain to a more natural state in upcoming weeks. The restoration work was a condition of the permit agreement with Chaffee County.

Bobbi McClead, natural resource manager, said a special permit is needed from the U.S. Army Corps for construction in a wetland environment, and the plan is to apply soon for the permit.

“When it’s done, all indication of the hatchery will be gone,” she said.

The plan is to remove all man-made structures from the wetland area to create a more natural habitat and an educational site for school use.

The upper pond will be expanded with an island for fowl habitat, and the ponds will be lined with geotextile liner. The liner will help filter, drain and protect the ponds.

McClead said because the wetlands are a sensitive habitat, they will not be open to the public, but schools will be able to schedule educational visits.

The Ruby Mountain spring area is between 16 and 18 acres, she said.

McClead said she expects the reclamation project to be completed in 2012 with the bulk of the construction occurring in spring during low groundwater flows.

She said there is a large variability of underground flows, which can range from 500 to 2,000 gallons per minute.

There are two pump houses on the property, but only one is operational. McClead said the older pump house is used as a backup if needed.

She said Nestlé is permitted to pump up to 122 gallons per minute per day from the operating well, but it runs continually at 110 gallons per minute to keep the water moving.

McClead said they are only taking a “portion” of what would naturally be lost, so there is “no depletion of water over time.”

Eight times a day, seven days a week tankers haul the water from storage silos in Johnson’s Village to Denver to be bottled as Arrowhead brand spring water.

McClead said in the next couple of weeks loads being driven to Denver will be reduced to five days a week.

At this time of year, more than half of what is pumped from the well is returned to the Arkansas River, she said.

Mike Allen, owner of Apex Development Services, LLC, is assisting with the reclamation project.

He said that, when the reclamation is complete, a conservation easement will be put in place, and nothing else will happen in the wetland except water monitoring.

McClead said the bulk of Nestlé-owned Arrowhead spring water is bottled in California. She said there is a “significant demand” for the brand in the Rocky Mountain region and “it didn’t make sense from a fuel-usage or carbon-footprint standpoint” to transport the water from California.

“We had the opportunity to reduce trucking miles by creating a source in Colorado,” she said.

The spring at Ruby Mountain is the only Nestlé-operated spring in the state, but the company has about 50 springs nationwide that supply water for 11 brand names owned by Nestlé.

link to the original article:

http://www.themountainmail.com/main.asp?SectionID=4&SubSectionID=4&ArticleID=23646

 

Nestle Prepares to Restore Fish Hatchery: Precious Access in Colorado

Inaccessible to general public due to “sensitive habitat,” however Nestle will continue pumping 5 days a week, 8 trucks a day.

DWL believes that this article is a perfect example of the marriage between corporate water miners and state officials.  A comment below the article sums it up nicely: “On one hand, Nestle says they want to “create a more natural habitat.” On the other, they want to apply a “geotextile liner” to the ponds. Do the terms “geotextile liner” and “natural habitat” even belong in the same discussion? Just wondrin…”

Here is the article, published in The Mountain Mail on 9/30/2011 by Cailey McDermott:

Nestlé Waters North America, Inc., will request a permit to restore the old fish hatchery near Ruby Mountain to a more natural state in upcoming weeks. The restoration work was a condition of the permit agreement with Chaffee County.

Bobbi McClead, natural resource manager, said a special permit is needed from the U.S. Army Corps for construction in a wetland environment, and the plan is to apply soon for the permit.

“When it’s done, all indication of the hatchery will be gone,” she said.

The plan is to remove all man-made structures from the wetland area to create a more natural habitat and an educational site for school use.

The upper pond will be expanded with an island for fowl habitat, and the ponds will be lined with geotextile liner. The liner will help filter, drain and protect the ponds.

McClead said because the wetlands are a sensitive habitat, they will not be open to the public, but schools will be able to schedule educational visits.

The Ruby Mountain spring area is between 16 and 18 acres, she said.

McClead said she expects the reclamation project to be completed in 2012 with the bulk of the construction occurring in spring during low groundwater flows.

She said there is a large variability of underground flows, which can range from 500 to 2,000 gallons per minute.

There are two pump houses on the property, but only one is operational. McClead said the older pump house is used as a backup if needed.

She said Nestlé is permitted to pump up to 122 gallons per minute per day from the operating well, but it runs continually at 110 gallons per minute to keep the water moving.

McClead said they are only taking a “portion” of what would naturally be lost, so there is “no depletion of water over time.”

Eight times a day, seven days a week tankers haul the water from storage silos in Johnson’s Village to Denver to be bottled as Arrowhead brand spring water.

McClead said in the next couple of weeks loads being driven to Denver will be reduced to five days a week.

At this time of year, more than half of what is pumped from the well is returned to the Arkansas River, she said.

Mike Allen, owner of Apex Development Services, LLC, is assisting with the reclamation project.

He said that, when the reclamation is complete, a conservation easement will be put in place, and nothing else will happen in the wetland except water monitoring.

McClead said the bulk of Nestlé-owned Arrowhead spring water is bottled in California. She said there is a “significant demand” for the brand in the Rocky Mountain region and “it didn’t make sense from a fuel-usage or carbon-footprint standpoint” to transport the water from California.

“We had the opportunity to reduce trucking miles by creating a source in Colorado,” she said.

The spring at Ruby Mountain is the only Nestlé-operated spring in the state, but the company has about 50 springs nationwide that supply water for 11 brand names owned by Nestlé.

link to the original article:

http://www.themountainmail.com/main.asp?SectionID=4&SubSectionID=4&ArticleID=23646

 

Poland Springs: What it Means to be Exploited

H2O comes at a price for both our health and the environment

By: Alexa Coppola

On any given day in the progressive 21st century, a relatively intuitive economist might ask himself, “What may be the next most valuable commodity?”A greedy economist without regard for the environment or for his fellow citizens of the planet would tell you that water may be next in line for items of greatest value.Water — yes, water. The same water that runs through the tap when you pull the lever on the sink upwards, or turn the knob of a faucet. Not water that is “purified” or somehow better because it has come prepackaged, cleaner, merely because it comes in a bottle.

The exploitation of water is an issue that is becoming more urgent with every passing day. This can be attributed to enormous water bottle corporations essentially stealing water from communities and selling it back to us.

And these are not communities in some far off, unreachable land; they are towns in places like Maine and Colorado, who have reservoirs for tap water just like any town might.

A water bottle corporation will go into these towns, purchase a small plot of land for the bare minimum price, and basically use this land to claim entire bodies of water.

This water will be neatly packaged and sold back to the community who is supposed to have access to clean water sources. Now, the only sources they’ll have are wrapped in a thin layer of plastic and purchased at the grocery store.

This works so tremendously well because the bottles are sold everywhere to people who have no idea that this water theft phenomenon is even occurring.

And it doesn’t help that these corporate water giants literally reverse the harmful facts of wasteful water bottle usage to deter from the negative attention it would naturally create.

Poland Spring is a prime example, who’s advertisements tell us that their drinking water comes from the natural springs of Maine. But whose natural springs are we drinking from, exactly?

Poland Spring, Aquafina and Dasani all find their origins in public water sources, which means that the water you’re paying for is pretty much the exact same water that runs from the tap.

There are few exceptions. One exception is that the water from your tap isn’t stolen from an unassuming town. Another is that the water coming from your tap comes straight from the area’s reservoir.

Who knows what the water went through before it was bottled? Probably not the person drinking it. It is also confined within a plastic bottle, which contains innumerable hazardous and harmful chemicals.

But this is controversial subject matter for another day.

It is true that this is shocking information that can impact the daily lives of many of us, but there are certainly measures we can take to stop this exploitation and robbery from occurring.

We can cease purchasing bottled water and instead carry our own reusable water bottles. Fewer sales of these useless items will result in less demand for them, and less need for their supply.

These are small steps, but it is the small measures taken by many individuals that equal the big steps that are necessary for the sustenance of our society.

link to original article: http://www.themontclarion.org/archives/3738832

Nestle “Pinks” its Image to Mask Use of Cancer-Producing Plastic Resins

Nestle® Pure Life® Purified Water partners with The Breast Cancer Research Foundation® To Support Breast Cancer Awareness by funding BCRF Research Grants with Special “Pink Pack” Retail Program.

What Nestle would rather you did not know, is that byproducts styrene and benzene released into the air from producing their plastic water bottles may cause cancer.  In addition, Nestle admits to using BPA lined cans for their liquid baby formula, a plastic known to cause cancer.

for more info: http://www.allergystore.com/articles/water_3.htm and http://www.stainlesswaterbottles.org/2010/01/15/what-is-bpa-the-facts-and-details-of-bpa/

Here is the link to the article applauding Nestle for supporting Breast Cancer:

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/nestle-pure-life-purified-water-is-proud-to-partner-with-the-breast-cancer-research-foundation-to-support-breast-cancer-awareness-2011-09-28

It is a good pink-washing scheme, but we’re onto you Nestle!

Friends of Sebago Lake Comments of EGGI and Normandeau Studies on Fryeburg

Friends of Sebago Lake provides comments on two Fryeburg water studies which study the altered hydrologic flow impacts on Wards Brook Aquifer and Lovewell Pond caused by ground and spring water extraction by local uses and Poland Spring, a subsidiary of the Nestle Corporation.

Written by Roger Wheeler.

Link to comments: http://friendsofsebago.blogspot.com/2008/05/eggi-and-noramndeau-study-fosl-comments.html

Victory Against Nestlé in Wacissa Florida Announced by Friends of the Wacissa

Sept. 16 — Last night at 7pm, the Jefferson County Board of County Commissioners unanimously passed a landmark “Aquifer Protection Ordinance,” that will protect the Wacissa River from bottling in the future, according to Friends of the Wacissa. The ordinance will protect the river by ensuring that attempts to take water from the county for bottling will have to be approved by a super majority of the county commissioners.
  l
In June of 2010, Nestlé set up four test wells to assess the Wacissa River as a potential site to pump water and truck it to a Nestlé bottling plant outside of Jefferson County, where Wacissa is located. This site would have pumped up to 1.5 million gallons of water a day from this undeveloped spring location, while taking a significant toll on the environment.
Friends of the Wacissa: http://www.savethewacissa.com/
Defending Water notes that to drive this victory deeper into law, organizers should learn about what our Maine communities of Shapleigh and Newfield have done with their local rights based ordinance.

“Nature’s Fix” is a new Nestle drug you don’t need

Nestle’s new social media campaign makes buying flavored carbonated water sound as addictive as the next biggest drug.  Calling it’s product, “Nature’s Fix,” the company wants consumers to get “hooked” on the product by succumbing to peer pressure from cute animals.  At the rate Nestle charges for the water they practically steal from vulnerable communities, over 1000 times the cost of tap water, it does seem kind of like a drug.  But it’s not, it’s water that all of us should have the right to drink without the privilege of paying Nestle for it.

“Get hooked on something good,” they say.  We think all of these drug references are fascinating, considering how unnecessary and irresponsible it is to buy bottled water of any kind in the first place.  See the video to the right of this article, “The Story of Bottled Water” for a sobering summary of the impact of plastic bottles on our planet, and all those fuzzy animals that Nestle is ripping off.

Aside from the environmental impact of plastic bottles, Nestle’s tactics to acquire their “fix” has devastated multiple communities around the U.S.  We have a summary of articles underneath our “Nestle” tab for further information.

Animals do not want you to drink Nestle’s water, even if it has little bubbles in it.  Nestle does not protect the environment, they are not good stewards, they are simply a huge corporation looking to create the biggest quarterly statement for their shareholders…and right now, people are into “healthy” products.  Don’t let the glass food storage jars behind the squirrel fool you in the commericals.  Nestle would not make any money if you used your own tap water and squeezed some lime into it.  You can make healthy choices without supporting this company that has a long global history of being destructive to people and to the environment.

Links to press coverage:

http://www.bevnet.com/news/2011/nestle-brings-on-mother-nature

 

http://popsop.com/48343

Nestle brands school children through nationwide “Recycle Bowl”

During these times where people everywhere are encouraged to “go green,” what sounds more responsible than supporting a nationwide competition to increase recycling in schools?  That’s what Nestle is hoping you’ll believe when you see their name across the country, sponsoring the “Recycle-Bowl.”  But what message is sent to the nation’s children when they learn about recycling from a corporation that bottles water for profit?  That it’s okay to buy Nestle’s water, and use more resources, because we can just turn around and recycle..no big deal!  They want people to forget the deep environmental impact caused by profit-driven water mining, trucking, and water bottles that use millions of gallons of oil to produce. Not to mention the critical loss of water rights in local communities.

Here is Nestle’s side of the story.  You can decide for yourself:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/keep-america-beautiful-launches-nationwide-k-12-school-recycling-competition-127884898.html

To learn more, click on “Nestle” in our side menu.