Bay-Deltal Tribunal Puts State and National Legal System on Trial: California’s Proposed Delta Tunnels Case to be Heard

“What would the San Francisco Bay-Delta ecosystem say?” is the question a panel of judges will consider when examining a case brought before them in the first-ever Bay Area Rights of Nature Tribunal based on an international rights of nature tribunal held in Paris during the climate talks last December. It’s a question gaining ground as dozens of U.S. and international communities and a handful of countries have begun recognizing rights and legal standing for ecosystems as a new framework for environmental protection.

The tribunal will be held on April 30 at the Nick Rodriguez Community Center in Antioch, CA 9:30 AM-2 PM. (RSVP on Facebook here)

The case being brought before the tribunal address nature’s, community, and human rights violations presented by Governor Brown’s water policies, and particularly his proposed Twin Tunnel plan, which would significantly reduce flows needed for Delta waterways and fish. The tribunal is being put on by the Bay Area Rights of Nature Alliance (BARONA)—a network of organizations seeking to explore how recognizing legal standing for ecosystems can put new governance tools in the hands of communities.

In addition to detailing rights violations, Tribunal witnesses and experts will also offer solutions to water flow and economic development challenges that protect, not injure, human and nature’s rights. “We are pleased to work with BARONA to make the case for the San Francisco Bay-Delta,” says Barbara Barrigan-Parrilla, executive director for Restore the Delta, a group that has been working to fight the governor’s plan and support sound water alternatives.“The Delta is an imperiled national treasure — a home for wildlife, fisheries, and human culture. After 30 years of over-pumping, the Delta Tunnels proposal would complete the destruction of the largest estuary on the west coast of the Americas. Those who view the Delta as simply another water source to be drained are in for a fight. The people and wildlife of the Delta will not be erased.”

“The proposed project not only violate nature’s rights and human rights, but also illustrates that our laws legalize such harms,” adds Linda Sheehan of the Earth Law Center. “This Tribunal is about confronting a system of laws that places people and nature in harm’s way, and demonstrating a new way forward.”

Judges for the tribunal include: renowned eco-philosopher Joanna Macy, governmental liaison for the Winnemem Wintu tribe Gary Mulcahy, Movement Rights director, Shannon Biggs and others to be confirmed.

Rights of nature is a global movement that has been named one of the Top Ten Grassroots Movements Taking on the World by Shift Magazine. International Tribunals in Paris, Lima and Quito have recognized nature’s rights, as has the Pope and other leading figures. “Rather than treating nature as property under the law, rights of nature acknowledges that the ecosystem—in this case the Delta itself—is a rights-bearing entity,” concluded Shannon Biggs, Director of Movement Rights, a group that assists California communities pass laws that place the rights of communities and ecosystems above corporate interests. “Mendocino County and Santa Monica have already recognized these rights in order to ban fracking and develop sustainability initiatives.”

This event is free and open to the public, but will require an RSVP. Donations encouraged. Please mark your calendars and join the growing movement for nature’s rights.

Source: http://us3.campaign-archive1.com/?u=06887fa70084fef8e939fef63&id=7cf97ba5b9&e=2842261f7e

Protesters converge on Nestlé bottling plants in Sacramento and LA

The outrage over the bottling of California water by Nestlé, Walmart and other big corporations during a record drought has become viral on social media and national and international press websites over the past couple of months.

On May 20, people from across the state converged on two Nestlé bottling plants – one in Sacramento and the other in Los Angeles – demanding that the Swiss-based Nestlé corporation halt its bottling operations during the state’s record drought.

Wednesday’s protest, led by the California-based Courage Campaign, was the third in Sacramento over the past year. The first two protests were “shut downs” this March and last October organized by the Crunch Nestlé Alliance. For my report on the March protest, go to:http://www.truth-out.org/….

For over an hour Wednesday, over 50 protesters held signs and marched as they chanted, “Hey hey, ho ho, Nestlé Waters has got to go,” “Water is a human right! Don’t let Nestlé win this fight,” and “Keep our water in the ground, Nestle Waters get out of town.”

One eight-foot-long banner at the Sacramento protest read: “Nestle, 515,000 people say leave California’s precious water in the ground,” referring to the total number of signatures on the petitions.

At the protests, activists delivered the 515,000 signatures from people in California and around the country who signed onto a series of petitions to Nestlé executives, Governor Brown, the California State Water Resources Control Board,  and the U.S. Forest Service urging an immediate shutdown of Nestlé’s bottling operations across the state.

The petitions were circulated by Courage Campaign, SumOfUs.org, CREDO, Corporate Accountability International, Avaaz, Food & Water Watch, Care2, Change.org and Daily Kos.

In Sacramento, local activists and residents joined residents from San Francisco and Oakland who took buses to protest outside Nestlé’s bottling plant at 8670 Younger Creek Drive. View photos from the Sacramento protest here: https://www.flickr.com/… in California.

Jessica Lopez, the Chair of the Concow Maidu Tribe, participated in the protest with her daughter, Salvina Chinook.

“I stand here in solidarity with everybody here demanding the protection of our water rights,” said Chair Lopez. “Nestle needs to stop bottling water during this drought. Why have they obtained their current permits to pump city water?”

Tim Molina, Strategic Campaign Organizer for the California-based Courage Campaign, who spoke at the Sacramento event, said to the crowd, “Today we are saying enough is enough. With people across California doing their part to conserve water — it’s time that Nestlé did the right thing and put people over profits –  by immediately halting their water bottling operations across the State.”

“If Nestlé won’t do what’s right to protect California’s precious water supply, it is up to Governor Brown and the California Water Resource Control Boards to step in and stop this blatant misuse of water during our State’s epic drought,” he said.

“Bottling public water for private profit doesn’t make sense for communities and it doesn’t make sense for the environment,” said Sandra Lupien, Western Region Communications Manager at Food & Water Watch, also at the protest in Sacrmaento. “During a historic drought crisis, it is utter madness to allow corporations like Nestlé to suck our dwindling groundwater and sell it for thousands of times what it pays. Putting a halt to water bottling in California is a no-brainer and Governor Jerry Brown must stand up to protect Californians’ public resource.”

After the activists gave the petitions to Nestle representatives at the Sacramento plant, the Nestle supervisor presented the organizers with a letter from Tim Brown, President and CEO of Nestle Waters North America, responding to a letter from the Courage Campaign.

Brown wrote, “Keep in mind that beverages consumed in California but not bottled in the state must be shipped a longer distance, which has its own drawbacks, such as the environmental impact of transportation. Sourcing water in California provides water with a lower carbon footprint, which has a beneficial environmental impact. The entire bottled industry accounts for 0.02 percent of the annual water used in California.”

The company said it also would like to engage in “thoughtful dialogue” with the water bottling opponents.

“We appreciate the opportunity to engage in thoughtful dialogue – and in meaningful action – to address California’s water challenges. We would welcome the opportunity to speak with you – in person or over the phone – to advance our shared desire for a more sustainable California. We are hopeful that the public discussion we are all engaged in around water use – including your efforts – leads to positive collective action.”

In 2014, Nestlé Waters used about 50 million gallons from the Sacramento municipal water supply to produce “Nestlé Pure Life® Purified Drinking Water” and for other plant operations, according to a statement from Nestlé Waters. To read the city of Sacramento’s responses to my questions about the Nestlé bottling plant’s use of city water, go to:http://www.dailykos.com/…)

In Los Angeles, local activists and residents were joined by people from Orange County and Long Beach who took buses to protest outside Nestlé’s bottling plant at 1560 East 20th Street.

The representatives from consumer, environmental and human rights groups who participated in the protest, like at the protest in Sacramento, blasted the corporation for making millions off bottled water during the drought when urban users are seeing increasing restrictions on their water use.

“As California’s water supplies dry up, Nestlé continues to make millions selling bottled water and that’s outrageous!” explained Liz McDowell, campaigner for SumOfUs.org. “We’ve stood up to Nestlé exploiting natural resources for profit in the past everywhere from Pakistan to Canada, and now the global community is speaking out before California runs completely dry.”

The Desert Sun reported earlier this month that Nestlé was bottling water in desert and drought-stricken areas of California and selling it for profit, all while its permit for water pipelines and wells in the San Bernardino National Forest lists 1988 as the year of expiration. Nestlé currently extracts water from at least a dozen natural springs in California for its Arrowhead and Pure Life brands.(http://www.desertsun.com/…)

A majority of people in the U.S. believe Nestle should stop bottling in California, according to a recent poll. However, in spite of the clear and growing public outcry, when asked about the controversy, Nestlé CEO Tim Brown remarked that he wished the multinational corporation could bottle more water from the drought stricken state, the groups pointed out.

“Nestlé is profiteering at the expense of the public interest,” stated Zack Malitz, Campaign Manager at CREDO Action. “In the midst of an historic drought with no end in sight, it is wildly irresponsible for Nestle to extract vast amounts of California’s water.”

Joe Baker, Care2’s Vice President of Advocacy and Editorial, said, “Care2 and its 30 million members are an online community standing together for good – and it is not good for the public to have Nestle bottling our water during an extreme drought in California. We’re asking Nestle to do the responsible thing for the public good, and stop bottling water in a drought-stricken area. Every single drop counts.”

“For decades, Nestle has demonstrated a blatant disregard for local communities and the environment,” said Erin Diaz, the campaign director at Corporate Accountability International’s Think Outside the Bottle campaign. “In response to community concerns about its backdoor political dealings and environmental damage, Nestle has poured millions into PR and greenwashing campaigns. But Nestle’s money can’t wash away its abysmal track record, and Californians are demanding an end to Nestle’s abusive practices.”

John Tye, Campaign Director, Avaaz, concluded, “Families across the American West are already paying a steep price for mismanagement and scandalous selloffs of public resources. It’s time for California, and Governor Brown, to set a strong example for conservation and responsive regulation. Tens of thousands of people across the country are tired of watching companies like Nestlé profit at the expense of the taxpayers.”

The protests take place as Jerry Brown continues to push his plan to construct two massive tunnels under the Delta, potentially the most environmentally destructive protect in California history. The twin tunnels would divert massive quantities of water from the Sacramento River to be used by corporate agribusiness interests irrigating drainage impaired land on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley, as well as to Southern California water agencies and oil companies conducting fracking and steam injection operations.

The construction of the tunnels would hasten the extinction of winter-run Chinook salmon, Central Valley steelhead, Delta and longfin smelt, green sturgeon and other imperiled fish species, as well as threaten the salmon and steelhead populations on the Trinity and Klamath rivers.

But the tunnels plan is just one of the many environmentally destructive policies of the Brown administration. Governor Brown has presided over record water exports and fish kills at the Delta pumping facilities; promotes the expansion of fracking in California; pursues water policies that have driven Delta smelt, winter-run Chinook salmon and other fish species closer to extinction; and authorized the completion of questionable “marine protected areas” created under the helm of a big oil lobbyist during the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) Initiative. (http://www.truth-out.org/…)

The groups are now urging everybody to sign the pledge by Daily Kos, Courage Campaign and Corporate Accountability International: Do not drink bottled water from Nestlé:https://www.dailykos.com/…

This is the text of the pledge to Nestlé Corporation:

I pledge to choose tap water instead of buying the following Nestlé products: Acqua Panna, Arrowhead, Deer Park, Ice Mountain, Nestea, Nestlé Pure Life, Ozarka, Perrier, Poland Spring, Resource, S. Pellegrino, Sweet Leaf, Tradewinds and Zephyrhills.

For more information, go to: https://www.couragecampaign.org/…

https://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2015/05/21/18772569.php

Tethys’ Pullout of Bottling Plant Draws Mixed Response

Anacortes American
Wednesday, September 18, 2013
Tethys’ pullout draws mixed response
BY KIMBERLY JACOBSON

Reactions are mixed to the announcement last week that Tethys Enterprises backed out of its plans for a bottling facility on the island.

Some residents were pleased the proposed 1-million-square-foot plant is off the table while others are lamenting the potential jobs lost. But all are looking to the future and how Anacortes could plan to best utilize the property — and how to attract a business that more people can get behind and support.

In a letter sent to Mayor Dean Maxwell last week, Tethys CEO Steve Winter said the project was viable, but the company and its principals had other opportunities come up over time. They opted to halt their efforts on the bottling plant project.

Tethys has worked on the project for several years and signed a water contract with the city in late 2010.

Winter has not answered requests for further comment.

Sandra Spargo, who organized Defending Water in the Skagit River Basin, said she’s received about 200 emails since the announcement last week.

“I am getting a lot of emails from people who are happy about this,” she said. “I am relieved but cautiously relieved because I don’t know what this means.”

She has heard from residents who still have questions: Can Tethys sell the water contract to another company? Has Tethys reimbursed the city for all expenses? Will the city still pursue the urban growth area expansion request?

Mayor Dean Maxwell said the contract is “dead.” In order to transfer water rights, Tethys would have to make a request and it would have to be OK’d by the City Council. He said there’s been no request. He said a new company couldn’t meet deadlines built into the contract anyway.

“It’s just not going to happen,” he said.

Tethys has one more small payment to the city to reimburse it for all expenses, Maxwell said.

He said the city will discuss the UGA expansion request after the November election. It could be rolled into the city’s 2016 comprehensive plan update — but that’s up to the City Council.

“There’s no urgency now,” Maxwell said.

City Council member Ryan Walters said he’d like the city to send a letter to Tethys thanking them for their time and indicating the contract is terminated because they say they will not fulfill their side.

“I think we need to clean that up,” he said.

Walters said he wasn’t surprised Tethys backed out. He said the idea didn’t seem conceivable. The plant was proposed to be the largest in the country, but Tethys hadn’t bottled beverages before and it didn’t appear to have any real assets, he said.

“It didn’t really strike me as a very serious effort,” Walters said.

Peggy Flynn, who met Winter in an MBA program in 1986, introduced him at some of the community events he attended.

She said Anacortes has lost the economic benefits of a construction project that would have hired 250 workers and spent $500 million to build the facility as well as the potential for a significant number of well-paying jobs.

“We’ve lost what would have been the most environmentally and technologically advanced beverage manufacturing plant in the world,” Flynn said — citing plans for biodegradable and recyclable packaging materials, reduced and recycled wastewater, and the use of rail instead of trucks.

She said the good news is that Anacortes still has water rights and can look for other economic opportunities going forward.

Spargo said now is the time for a community discussion.

“I think this is an opportunity for the community to come together and give their vision of what they would like to see out there as possibilities,” she said. “We need a plan. We need a plan for all our city.”

She sees the grassroots Defending Water group continuing to have a voice in the process.

Walters said he’d like to see the city continue to explore the current comprehensive plan proposal that would limit the size of facilities on industrial property.

“If something is going to be massive, 1 million square feet, then we need to look at it and it needs to be not outright allowed,” he said.

The approval process wouldn’t have to take long, he said. As it is now, a massive facility could come in for a building permit with environmental review, but without council consultation. He said in the future water shouldn’t be the focus.

“When we look at economic development look for industries that provide good jobs — not industries that use water,” Walters said.

Tethys timeline

• April 2008 — Tethys Enterprises is formed.

• April 12, 2010 — Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson, in a letter to Tethys CEO Steve Winter, says the city will discontinue any further work on the proposed agreement to build a bottling plant there. He cited a concern that Tethys refused to link water provided to the number of jobs created.

• Sept. 13, 2010 — The Anacortes City Council approves a contract to provide up to 5 million gallons of water a day to Tethys. The contract, dated Oct. 1, 2010, requires the company to provide a legal description and map of property for the development. It must be at least 30 acres, served by rail and within the city limits.

• October 2010 — Defending Water in the Skagit River Basin was formed as a “grass-roots educational influence to promote citizen input regarding the contract signed between the City of Anacortes and Tethys Enterprises.” It is associated with the Alliance for Democracy.

• Sept. 26, 2011 — The City Council approves a contract extension, requiring Tethys to find property by Dec. 1, 2012.

• July 31, 2012 — The City of Anacortes requests adding about 11 acres off Highway 20 near Stevenson Road to its urban growth area. The site was being eyed for Tethys. At the time, Mayor Dean Maxwell said the city will benefit from the added industrial property no matter what ends up there.

• Oct. 10, 2012 — The county requests more information from the city about its UGA request.

• Nov. 29, 2012 — Tethys gets title commitments for 30.33 acres of property at Highway 20 and Reservation Road near Stevenson Road. At the time, Winter told the American the 30.33-acre site was just part of the plan. It also proposed to use about 11 acres the city requested to be added to its urban growth area and, at the time, Tethys was in discussion with other property owners.

According to the contract, Tethys then had two years to complete the necessary studies and apply for permits. The plant was required to be up and running by June 1, 2018, according to the contract.

• April 9, 2013 — Skagit County commissioners hold a public hearing on the city’s UGA expansion request. Speakers brought up issues including traffic concerns, the size of the proposed Tethys plant, the city infrastructure to support any amount of acreage outside the presently designated city limits and the Tethys project being out of scale for the site and nearby communities.

• July 10, 2013 — Skagit County commissioners voted unanimously to docket the City of Anacortes UGA expansion request, allowing the review process to continue. An environmental review process was the next step.

• Sept. 10, 2013 — The city announces Tethys has backed out of its proposal.

Upcoming East-West Corridor Events

Updated February 10, 2013

February 21 ~ Hancock County Democratic Committee, 7-8pm, Ellsworth City Hall, FMI Contact Kent Price 469-1903 
Chris Buchanan, coordinator for Stop the [East-West] Corridor, and State Representative
Katherine Cassidy (D-Lubec) at 7 pm on Thursday, February 21, will address
the controversial East-West Highway currently planned for the Calais area to
Coburn Gore. The presentation will be the feature segment of the Hancock
County Democratic Committee’s regular monthly meeting, in Ellsworth City
Hall’s third-floor auditorium.

Chris Buchanan, who is working with many groups opposing the toll road, will
provide an overview of the proposal. Rep. Cassidy is a co-sponsor of the
bill to defund the $300,000 economic feasibility study that had been
authorized by the previous Maine legislature.

March 2 ~ Presentation at Dexter School, 1-4pm
Presentation for the local community being organized by STEWC members.  Confirmed details TBA soon!
March 9 ~ Outreach / Informational Meeting
STEWC meeting focused on sharing information and reaching out to more people, being organized by Sidney Mitchell.  Confirmed details TBA shortly.
 
March 13 ~ The East-West Corridor, Why Not? A Panel Presentation and Community Conversation by STEWC 
5:30 – 7:30pm Washington County Community College Lecture Hall, Calais
Panelists include:
Gene Ripley – jobs and economic impacts
Maria Girouard – water, natural resources, and our relationship with the Earth
Paul Schroeder – transparency, sovereignty / local control, eminent domain, Public-Private-Partnerships
Chris Buchanan – introductory overview, moderation
Jane Crosen is working with the map team to provide high quality maps of potential routes.
March 27 ~ The East-West Corridor, Why Not? A Panel Presentation and Community Conversation by STEWC 
5:30 – 7:30pm University of Maine at Machias, Lecture Hall in the Science Building, Machias
Panelists include:
Gene Ripley – jobs and economic impacts
Maria Girouard – water, natural resources, connecting the dots, and our relationship with the Earth
Paul Schroeder – transparency, sovereignty / local control, eminent domain, Public-Private-Partnerships
Chris Buchanan – introductory overview, moderation
Jane Crosen is working with the map team to provide high quality maps of potential routes.
March 30 ~ next STEWC coalition meeting, Daybreak Cafe, Old Town, exact time TBA but expect it to be in the morning
 
April 7 ~ Alliance for the Common Good Teach-In, UMO
More details TBA.  The theme is “Budget For All . . . Why not?” After keynote speakers there will be a panel of five people talking about topics of concern. Finally there will be two sessions of workshops with 5 workshops in each session.  The proposed LPG Tank in Searsport and the E/W Corridor will be the focus of one of the workshops. The Alliance has three slogans, one of which is a Develop a Maine Economy that protects Maine’s Environment. In this 40 minute workshop we will provide context and information for the group on how people can become involved in our campaigns.  Maximum participation is encouraged.
April 11 ~ AN EAST-WEST CORRIDOR THROUGH MAINE? PERSPECTIVES FROM THE PEOPLE
part of the Socialist and Marxist Studies Series (controversy series) this Spring on Thursdays, 12:30-1:45pm in the Bangor Room, Memorial Union, UMO
 
John Banks is a Penobscot tribal member and has served as Director of its
Natural Resources for 32 years.
Chris Buchanan is Maine Coordinator for Defending Water for Life and
statewide Coordinator for Stop the East-West Corridor (STEWC).
Gene Ripley is a farmer and entrepreneur whose Dover-Foxcroft farm may lie
in the path of the proposed East-West corridor.

STEWC has strong presence at Rally of Unity on January 8th!

On January 8th, members of STEWC joined members of over 20 other progressive activist groups in a Rally of Unity at the State House.  It was an inspiring and successful day with over 150 participants, including drumming and dancing led by members of the Wabanaki Confederacy who are also raising awareness on #IdleNoMore.  Thanks to everyone for coming to speak to legislators and share hope for a healthy and prosperous future in Maine, the way life should be!

DSC00148

Click on the following links for video and news coverage:

WERU

Portland Phoenix article by Lance Tapley

WGME Channel 13

Morning Sentinel

 

Here is the press release from the event:

Press Release

On January 8th, 2013 the Alliance for Common Good will hold a “Rally of Unity” in the Statehouse Hall of Flags.  Participants will assemble on the common area outside of the statehouse at 12:00 noon and proceed to the Hall of Flags at 1:00. The “Rally of Unity” is assembling as a unified front to push back against corporate dominance in government. The primary focus is giving voice to ordinary Maine people who are concerned about the fiscal cliff, cuts to social services, the East-West corridor, open pit mining of Bald Mountain, tar sands pipelines, importing out of state waste, and the liquefied propane tank at Sears Island.  All of these issues threaten to irreversibly harm Maine’s people, economy, and environment.

The Alliance for Common Good is a collaboration of over 20 of Maine-based progressive activist groups that agree with these basic principles: We want legislators to prioritize Maine money for Maine people, developing a Maine economy that protects the environment, and getting money out of politics.  On January 8th, individual groups will provide their own message to the public and legislators by theater, song or signage.

It is hoped that all likeminded people will join us at the State House in reminding our newly elected state officials that they have been elected to represent the best interests of all of Maine’s people on this first day of the 126th Legislature.

drummers

The Alliance for Common Good currently includes:

350 Maine, AbilityMaine, Activist Art, Alliance for Democracy, American Friends Service Committee, Americans Who Tell the Truth, Bring Our War $$ Home, Citizens United, CodePink, Defending Water for Life, Don’t Waste ME, Food and Water Watch, Food for Maine’s Future, Friends of Merrymeeting Bay, Global Network, Industrial Wind activists, Maine EarthFirst!, Maine Greens, Maine Peace Action, Maine Prisoner Advocacy Coalition, National War Tax Resisters, Occupy groups statewide, Pax Christi Maine, Peace and Justice Center of Eastern Maine, Peninsula Peace and Justice, Pine Tree Youth Organizing, Resources for Organizing and Social Change, Social Workers,  Searsport LPG activists, Stop the East-West Corridor, Thanks But No Tank, Veterans for Peace… and growing!

Rally of Unity, January 8th, State House!

Rally of Unity…

January 8th, NOON, State House, Augusta

…for our people AND our environment on the first day of the 126th Legislature ! ! !

Organized by the Alliance for the Common Good, an ad-hoc coalition assembling as a unified front under the theme, “Maine the Possible” to give voice to ordinary Maine people and to push back against corporate dominance in government, with hopes to organize into the future. Principles we agree on:

Maine $$ for Maine People

A Maine Economy that Protects our Environment

Money Out of Politics

Current details:

-At NOON we will gather outside, possible activities include:

-holding hands in a circle of unity

-singing

-skits

-color blocks (many people wearing one color)

-At 1pm we will move into the Hall of Flags, possible activities include:

-citizen lobbying

-a human oil spill or “die-in” (wear black and lie on the floor)

 

-Individuals and groups should represent themselves visually, and be creative to highlight issues

 

-No groups will be featured.  We do not all agree or endorse each other, but we can rally behind the above principles, therefore:

-One press release will represent all of us.  To contribute to the release, or to be on the list to review the release before it’s sent out, contact Lew before January 1: kingsburyk(at)hotmail(dot)com

-Alliance spokespeople will talk to press at the event.  We’d prefer these to be citizens with a personal story, who will speak to the message of unity and say why they’re at the rally.

-One resource packet for legislators will be available. To include your issue in the packet contact Ridgely with a one page, black and white document: ridgelyfuller(at)gmail(dot)com

 

Join us:  The bigger the movement, the stronger the impact!  If your organization is interested in joining the Alliance for the Common Good on January 8th, please contact Chris to confirm your support: chris(at)defendingwater(dot)net We will be in contact with you after January 8th to explore the future of this Alliance.

 

The Alliance for the Common Good currently includes:

350 Maine, AbilityMaine, Activist Art, Alliance for Democracy, American Friends Service Committee, Americans Who Tell the Truth, Bring Our War $$ Home, Citizens United, CodePink, Defending Water for Life, Don’t Waste ME, Food and Water Watch, Food for Maine’s Future, Global Network, Industrial Wind activists, Maine EarthFirst!, Maine Greens, Maine Peace Action, Maine Prisoner Advocacy Coalition, National War Tax Resisters, Occupy groups statewide, Pax Christi Maine, Peace and Justice Center of Eastern Maine, Peninsula Peace and Justice, Pine Tree Youth Organizing, Resources for Organizing and Social Change, Social Workers,  Searsport LPG activists, Stop the East-West Corridor …

Rally of Unity, January 8th, State House!

 

Join Stop the East-West Corridor at the Rally of Unity!

*JANUARY 8             STATE HOUSE              AUGUSTA*

 

Wear your blaze orange! ! !

 

11:30am : Meet-Up in Parking Lot behind the Blaine House

Let’s get fired up! Share info, signs, materials, blaze orange, etc…

 

NOON : Rally between State House and Cross Building

Carry signs and banners, sing songs, do a little skit?  Spokespeople talk to media!

 

1pm : Move into Hall of Flags

More rallying! Talk to legislators, wear black under your orange for a mock oil spill…

 

Needed:

  • A carpool coordinator, and carpool volunteers
  • Media spokespeople
  • Citizen lobbyists
  • to help contact: Chris 357-1443 or chris@defendingwater.net

 

With new information that Cianbro is speaking to Town Managers behind the backs of the public, we are gearing up for the next phase of organizing to stop the corridor!  This rally is an opportunity to come together, in solidarity with over 20 other environmental and social justice groups across the state, to tell our legislators to represent US by protecting our homes, health, and quality of life.  See you there in your BLAZE ORANGE!

 

no corridor, no compromise!

Whose Valley is it Anyway?

The 9th Annual Skagit Human Rights Festival
March 2012
Whose Valley is it Anyway? 
Corporate Power or Community Power?
March is Human Rights Month in Skagit County, and the Skagit Human Rights Festival has some great events planned to put relevant conversations on the community table.
  • Lee Mann Exhibition–Art opening, Thurs., March 1, 5 p.m, Skagit Valley College multipurpose room. Letters and photos of longtime Skagit Valley human rights advocate Lee Mann on display. His son, Bryce Mann, to make the presentation.
  • Human Rights Display, Fri., March 2, 5-7 p.m., Lincoln Theatre Art Bar, downtown Mount Vernon. Skagit art pieces will relate to corporations, civil liberties, water and labor. Artists Richard Olmsted, Thais Armstrong, Sue Wren, Jessica Gigot and Kerry Scott.
  • Corporations and the Rise of Occupy, Thur., March 8, 7 p.m., Phillip Tarro Theatre, Skagit Valley College. Movie showing of Inside Job about the U. S. financial crisis followed by a corporate personhood Q&A panel session. Panel members involved with the Northwest Occupy Movement.
  • Civil Liberties and E-Verify, Thurs., March 15, 7 p.m., Phillip Tarro Theatre, Skagit Valley College. Lt. Col. Margaret Stock (ret.), political science instructor and award winning lawyer from Alaska, explains how the E-Verify national database will impact all of us–not only undocumented immigrants.
  • Defending Water, Thurs., March 22, 7 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, downtown Mount Vernon. Sandra Spargo, Alliance for Democracy, will show the movie TAPPED about the bottled water industry and will discuss the Anacortes contract to build a bottled water/beverage & food manufacturing plant entitled to five million gallons of water per day.
  • Labor, Thurs., March 29, 7 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, downtown Mount Vernon. Jeff Johnson, President of the Washington State Labor Council, and young labor activists will describe how unions champion the rights of all workers and will show two short movies: Eyes on the Fries and We Are the ILWU.
Visit www.skagithrf.wordpress.com for a complete list of event details.