Anacortes/A town in-between

Sandra Spargo, Defending Water in the Skagit River Basin, Anacortes, Wash.

Dec. 12, 2012

Will Anacortes’ push for manufacturing jobs on Fidalgo Island take us back to the future, when mills of many kind lined the Anacortes waterfront in the 1900s?

A town in-between by local author William Dietrich was published in the Seattle Times’ Pacific Northwest Magazine on Feb. 20, 2005.  The article’s excerpts include the following:
  • With its industrial legacy and recreational future, Anacortes remains confused about where it goes next. Despite the presence of some beautiful waterfront parks, most of its shoreline is still relegated to industry. City officials want to draw middle-wage boat builders, not barristas and barmaids. Nor is Anacortes willing to take anything that comes along. Citizens voted to block a third grocery store because it would occupy land originally cleared for industry and was too far from the downtown core. Many testified against welcoming a luxury-yacht builder onto public port land, so the company went to Port Angeles instead.
  • “We’re not in a hurry,” says Mayor Maxwell. “We don’t have to do backflips to attract business. If Anacortes stays the way it is, that’s just fine.” A long line of fast-talking promoters has come to town with dubious dreams, little capital and less delivery.

What direction will Tethys Enterprises’ bottling plant take Anacortes and Skagit Valley?

Does a one-million-square-foot beverage bottling plant–along with its trucks and trains–fit Anacortes and Skagit Valley’s culture, lifestyle and environment?

 
Steve Winter, CEO of Tethys Enterprises, states on Go Skagit (Sept. 14, 2012) that his plan “is to create a ‘center of gravity’ for the beverage industry in Anacortes that would attract a bevy of suppliers and service businesses, similar to how the presence of Boeing established a ring of support industries to northwest Washington.”

Winter states the following in the Skagit Valley Herald of Sun., Dec. 9, 2012:
  • The huge advantage that we will have is the ability to instantaneously produce product for the entire western United States. So when a company wants to do a brand introduction, they can come to one company–to our company–and have us manufacture a product for the entire western United States. 
 What is the definition of the “western United States?” Regional definitions vary from source to source. As defined by the Census Bureau, the western United States includes 13 states: AlaskaArizonaCaliforniaColoradoHawaiiIdahoMontanaNevadaNew MexicoOregonUtahWashington, and Wyoming. In turn, this region is sub-divided into Mountain and Pacific areas. The states in light red, particularly the Plains States, are sometimes considered “western,” although they are often grouped with separate regions such as theMidwest and the South. (Wikipedia)

Moreover, previous to the Anacortes contract, Tethys courted the City of Everett for five million gallons of water per day from Spada Lake to produce bottled water. During the failed courtship, Tethys hired Jason Jenkins to produce a pre-contractual promotional video. The video starred Mayor Ray Stephanson. He stated that Everett has the capacity to fill the entire bottled water demand for the western U.S., and Everett’s rail and deepwater port give easy and low-cost access to western U. S. and Asian markets. —  By the way, Everett, Bellingham and Anacortes offer deepwater ports for Asian export of bottled water/beverages. See Tethys’ promotional video at  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19y5bxfbF2Q


Anacortes/A town in-between

Sandra Spargo, Defending Water in the Skagit River Basin, Anacortes, Wash.

Dec. 12, 2012

Will Anacortes’ push for manufacturing jobs on Fidalgo Island take us back to the future, when mills of many kind lined the Anacortes waterfront in the 1900s?

A town in-between by local author William Dietrich was published in the Seattle Times’ Pacific Northwest Magazine on Feb. 20, 2005.  The article’s excerpts include the following:
  • With its industrial legacy and recreational future, Anacortes remains confused about where it goes next. Despite the presence of some beautiful waterfront parks, most of its shoreline is still relegated to industry. City officials want to draw middle-wage boat builders, not barristas and barmaids. Nor is Anacortes willing to take anything that comes along. Citizens voted to block a third grocery store because it would occupy land originally cleared for industry and was too far from the downtown core. Many testified against welcoming a luxury-yacht builder onto public port land, so the company went to Port Angeles instead.
  • “We’re not in a hurry,” says Mayor Maxwell. “We don’t have to do backflips to attract business. If Anacortes stays the way it is, that’s just fine.” A long line of fast-talking promoters has come to town with dubious dreams, little capital and less delivery.

What direction will Tethys Enterprises’ bottling plant take Anacortes and Skagit Valley?

Does a one-million-square-foot beverage bottling plant–along with its trucks and trains–fit Anacortes and Skagit Valley’s culture, lifestyle and environment?

 
Steve Winter, CEO of Tethys Enterprises, states on Go Skagit (Sept. 14, 2012) that his plan “is to create a ‘center of gravity’ for the beverage industry in Anacortes that would attract a bevy of suppliers and service businesses, similar to how the presence of Boeing established a ring of support industries to northwest Washington.”

Winter states the following in the Skagit Valley Herald of Sun., Dec. 9, 2012:
  • The huge advantage that we will have is the ability to instantaneously produce product for the entire western United States. So when a company wants to do a brand introduction, they can come to one company–to our company–and have us manufacture a product for the entire western United States. 
 What is the definition of the “western United States?” Regional definitions vary from source to source. As defined by the Census Bureau, the western United States includes 13 states: AlaskaArizonaCaliforniaColoradoHawaiiIdahoMontanaNevadaNew MexicoOregonUtahWashington, and Wyoming. In turn, this region is sub-divided into Mountain and Pacific areas. The states in light red, particularly the Plains States, are sometimes considered “western,” although they are often grouped with separate regions such as theMidwest and the South. (Wikipedia)

Moreover, previous to the Anacortes contract, Tethys courted the City of Everett for five million gallons of water per day from Spada Lake to produce bottled water. During the failed courtship, Tethys hired Jason Jenkins to produce a pre-contractual promotional video. The video starred Mayor Ray Stephanson. He stated that Everett has the capacity to fill the entire bottled water demand for the western U.S., and Everett’s rail and deepwater port give easy and low-cost access to western U. S. and Asian markets. —  By the way, Everett, Bellingham and Anacortes offer deepwater ports for Asian export of bottled water/beverages. See Tethys’ promotional video at  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19y5bxfbF2Q


Anacortes/A town in-between

Sandra Spargo, Defending Water in the Skagit River Basin, Anacortes, Wash.

Dec. 12, 2012

Will Anacortes’ push for manufacturing jobs on Fidalgo Island take us back to the future, when mills of many kind lined the Anacortes waterfront in the 1900s?

A town in-between by local author William Dietrich was published in the Seattle Times’ Pacific Northwest Magazine on Feb. 20, 2005.  The article’s excerpts include the following:
  • With its industrial legacy and recreational future, Anacortes remains confused about where it goes next. Despite the presence of some beautiful waterfront parks, most of its shoreline is still relegated to industry. City officials want to draw middle-wage boat builders, not barristas and barmaids. Nor is Anacortes willing to take anything that comes along. Citizens voted to block a third grocery store because it would occupy land originally cleared for industry and was too far from the downtown core. Many testified against welcoming a luxury-yacht builder onto public port land, so the company went to Port Angeles instead.
  • “We’re not in a hurry,” says Mayor Maxwell. “We don’t have to do backflips to attract business. If Anacortes stays the way it is, that’s just fine.” A long line of fast-talking promoters has come to town with dubious dreams, little capital and less delivery.

What direction will Tethys Enterprises’ bottling plant take Anacortes and Skagit Valley?

Does a one-million-square-foot beverage bottling plant–along with its trucks and trains–fit Anacortes and Skagit Valley’s culture, lifestyle and environment?

 
Steve Winter, CEO of Tethys Enterprises, states on Go Skagit (Sept. 14, 2012) that his plan “is to create a ‘center of gravity’ for the beverage industry in Anacortes that would attract a bevy of suppliers and service businesses, similar to how the presence of Boeing established a ring of support industries to northwest Washington.”

Winter states the following in the Skagit Valley Herald of Sun., Dec. 9, 2012:
  • The huge advantage that we will have is the ability to instantaneously produce product for the entire western United States. So when a company wants to do a brand introduction, they can come to one company–to our company–and have us manufacture a product for the entire western United States. 
 What is the definition of the “western United States?” Regional definitions vary from source to source. As defined by the Census Bureau, the western United States includes 13 states: AlaskaArizonaCaliforniaColoradoHawaiiIdahoMontanaNevadaNew MexicoOregonUtahWashington, and Wyoming. In turn, this region is sub-divided into Mountain and Pacific areas. The states in light red, particularly the Plains States, are sometimes considered “western,” although they are often grouped with separate regions such as theMidwest and the South. (Wikipedia)

Moreover, previous to the Anacortes contract, Tethys courted the City of Everett for five million gallons of water per day from Spada Lake to produce bottled water. During the failed courtship, Tethys hired Jason Jenkins to produce a pre-contractual promotional video. The video starred Mayor Ray Stephanson. He stated that Everett has the capacity to fill the entire bottled water demand for the western U.S., and Everett’s rail and deepwater port give easy and low-cost access to western U. S. and Asian markets. —  By the way, Everett, Bellingham and Anacortes offer deepwater ports for Asian export of bottled water/beverages. See Tethys’ promotional video at  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19y5bxfbF2Q


Anacortes/A town in-between

Sandra Spargo, Defending Water in the Skagit River Basin, Anacortes, Wash.

Dec. 12, 2012

Will Anacortes’ push for manufacturing jobs on Fidalgo Island take us back to the future, when mills of many kind lined the Anacortes waterfront in the 1900s?

A town in-between by local author William Dietrich was published in the Seattle Times’ Pacific Northwest Magazine on Feb. 20, 2005.  The article’s excerpts include the following:
  • With its industrial legacy and recreational future, Anacortes remains confused about where it goes next. Despite the presence of some beautiful waterfront parks, most of its shoreline is still relegated to industry. City officials want to draw middle-wage boat builders, not barristas and barmaids. Nor is Anacortes willing to take anything that comes along. Citizens voted to block a third grocery store because it would occupy land originally cleared for industry and was too far from the downtown core. Many testified against welcoming a luxury-yacht builder onto public port land, so the company went to Port Angeles instead.
  • “We’re not in a hurry,” says Mayor Maxwell. “We don’t have to do backflips to attract business. If Anacortes stays the way it is, that’s just fine.” A long line of fast-talking promoters has come to town with dubious dreams, little capital and less delivery.

What direction will Tethys Enterprises’ bottling plant take Anacortes and Skagit Valley?

Does a one-million-square-foot beverage bottling plant–along with its trucks and trains–fit Anacortes and Skagit Valley’s culture, lifestyle and environment?

 
Steve Winter, CEO of Tethys Enterprises, states on Go Skagit (Sept. 14, 2012) that his plan “is to create a ‘center of gravity’ for the beverage industry in Anacortes that would attract a bevy of suppliers and service businesses, similar to how the presence of Boeing established a ring of support industries to northwest Washington.”

Winter states the following in the Skagit Valley Herald of Sun., Dec. 9, 2012:
  • The huge advantage that we will have is the ability to instantaneously produce product for the entire western United States. So when a company wants to do a brand introduction, they can come to one company–to our company–and have us manufacture a product for the entire western United States. 
 What is the definition of the “western United States?” Regional definitions vary from source to source. As defined by the Census Bureau, the western United States includes 13 states: AlaskaArizonaCaliforniaColoradoHawaiiIdahoMontanaNevadaNew MexicoOregonUtahWashington, and Wyoming. In turn, this region is sub-divided into Mountain and Pacific areas. The states in light red, particularly the Plains States, are sometimes considered “western,” although they are often grouped with separate regions such as theMidwest and the South. (Wikipedia)

Moreover, previous to the Anacortes contract, Tethys courted the City of Everett for five million gallons of water per day from Spada Lake to produce bottled water. During the failed courtship, Tethys hired Jason Jenkins to produce a pre-contractual promotional video. The video starred Mayor Ray Stephanson. He stated that Everett has the capacity to fill the entire bottled water demand for the western U.S., and Everett’s rail and deepwater port give easy and low-cost access to western U. S. and Asian markets. —  By the way, Everett, Bellingham and Anacortes offer deepwater ports for Asian export of bottled water/beverages. See Tethys’ promotional video at  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19y5bxfbF2Q


A way to go: Plenty of hurdles left to clear before bottling plant gets off the ground

Skagit Valley Herald, Mount Vernon, Wash.

Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2012 2:05 am | Updated: 10:28 pm, Sat Dec 8, 2012.

By Mark Stayton

At least one crucial deadline has been met.

But developers of a proposed 1 million-square-foot bottled beverage manufacturing plant in Anacortes have plenty of other hoops to jump through before the project gets up and running.

Tethys Enterprises, Inc. met a Dec. 1 deadline to acquire property rights to at least 30 acres within city limits. That deadline was set by the city of Anacortes as part of a contract between Tethys and the city that would move the project forward.

The contract, signed in 2010, states that the city would sell the company 5 million gallons of water through 2035, with the option to extend through 2040, if the company could secure the rights to at least 30 acres of land with rail access within the city limits or an area that could be annexed.

On Nov. 29, the company identified a 30.3-acre parcel on the southwest intersection of Highway 20 and Reservation Road, where Sunland Bark & Topsoils now operates.

Tethys CEO Steve Winter said his company has been in negotiations to secure a suitable piece of land.

“We’re at the end of the beginning,” he said.

Anacortes Public Works Director Fred Buckenmeyer said the company still must meet several other deadlines and requirements before the city can sell water to the plant.

Tethys has two years to submit a building application — including environmental and traffic impact reviews — and the plant must be ready to start production two years after that, Buckenmeyer said. Tethys also will be responsible for upgrading the pumps at the city’s approximately $1 million new water treatment plant, Buckenmeyer said.

Anacortes currently has uninterpretable rights to 55 million gallons of water per day from the Skagit River, of which it uses approximately 21 million gallons.

The project has been controversial since it was proposed two years ago, dividing the city between those who say a new bottling plant could create hundreds of new jobs and become an economic boon, and others who contend the city has no business selling a public resource to a private business.

Critics quickly chided city officials — particularly Mayor Dean Maxwell — for not allowing more public comment about the proposal and the contract before the city agreed to sign it. Some argued that city leaders should have been discussing the proposal more in public.

Several recent City Council meetings were the scene of even more heated discussion over the plant, as Anacortes signed off on a petition to expand the city’s urban growth area — ostensibly to provide land for the plant — without the City Council’s prior approval. Maxwell said signing the application was legal and within his jurisdiction.

For his part, Winter said his proposal represents a new level of efficiency, scale and environmentally friendly practices in the beverage world and would diversify the county’s economy with a recession-resistant industry. He said the project is put forth by local business people who want to capitalize on what the Northwest has to offer.

“We are, you know, local guys who have developed a partnership, that have a commitment to area and have a dream, you know, the typical entrepreneurial dream,” Winter said during a recent interview with the Skagit Valley Herald. “That we saw an opportunity in an industry that was not being filled, with a very creative idea, and we want to pursue that creative idea to fill that market opportunity.”

Senate Candidates share position on E/W Corridor

Senate Question 10-29-12

Link to article and video.

 by WABI-TV5 News Desk – October 29th 2012 11:09am – Read more 2012 Candidate Profiles

The campaign trail is heating up as the campaign season winds down.

TV 5 has been featuring the three major candidates running to replace Sen. Olympia Snowe in the U.S. senate.

We asked our Facebook fans to post questions, and we then posed those to Angus King, Cynthia Dill and Charlie Summers.
Here is Monday’s inquiry.

Do you support the proposed East West Highway in Maine? Why or why not?

Angus King:
“I’m not ready to, to take a firm position on that. I’ve talked to Peter Vigue about it, I’ve talked to a lot of people in northern Maine most recently, just in the last few days. I guess I would say right now I’m skeptical. I need to understand what the benefits would be for Maine. I understand the benefits for Canada , for the Maritimes, and for Montreal, but I need to understand what would the benefits would be for Maine. I also need to understand why we can’t do what, what is being proposed, with the existing East-West highway in Maine, which is, which is the rail line. We already got a corridor straight through Maine, from the Mari-times into, into, into Quebec, and it’s been there for a hundred years. The line is there, the right away is there, we don’t have to spend a lot of money and, and do all of the environmental things to, to create a new strip through the state. So, I’m listening, the cases that would help the Port, it would help some of our great paper mills, and I’m very sympathetic to that, but I’m, I’m skeptical the benefits won’t be outweighed by the costs, particularly to run an entirely new corridor right through the state of Maine. But I do think we got to get natural gas to some of those paper mills, that’s the best thing we can do for them.”

Cynthia Dill:
“As a state senator, I’ve voted against using public money to fund a study for a private road. I don’t think that’s an appropriate use of government. I don’t believe that infrastructure should be privately owned, only to serve the interests of corporations that really just have a profit motive. So, the East-West highway, as it is currently proposed, is not something I support. If in fact, we as a community, as a state, as a country, need an East-West highway, if that would better the lives of people and businesses, then we should support it, using tax payer dollars and have it be open and accessible to everybody, on an equal basis. I do not believe that privatization of our infrastructure and our public ways is a good thing. It’s not going to help average working families. It’s gonna just help the corporations and super wealthy people that already have so much. ”

Charlie Summers:
“I think anything that can help with economic development is a good thing. My concern is the private property rights that are associated with that, so as this moves forward, I’ll be anxious to see how the legislature tackles it.”

E/W Alert! Canada to send Tar Sands Oil East, all articles here!

Plus this update: LePage’s private dealings with TarSand companies

Defending Water for Life in Maine and Stop the East-West Corridor members have anticipated exposure of the link between tar-sands oil and the East-West Corridor due to pressure to get the oil from Alberta to east coast ports.

While other environmental groups are focused on opposing the reversal of the Portland-Montreal Enbridge pipeline to transport tar sands from Montreal to Portland, we believe the East-West Corridor is a very viable option for this highly competitive industry.

While Exxon/Mobil wants Enbridge, TransCanada wants another route to the Atlantic.  Now, Canada has expressed a desire to ship tar-sands oil to Irving’s refinery in St. John’s, placing tremendous pressure on the development of the East-West Corridor through Maine.

Update article (11-14-12): TransCanada does not foresee major resistance to eastern oil pipe proposal.

Update article (11-8-12): Line 9 – Shipping Tar Sands Crude East.

Update articles (10-31-12): Eastern oil pipeline proposal technically, economically feasible: TransCanada.

Update article (10-31-12): TransCanada promotes crude solution.

Update article (10-12-12): LePage and the Maine DEP have met behind closed doors with Tar-Sands companies.

Here are a handful of articles on this topic (original post):

Another View: Turns out Canada does want to send oil east via pipelines

Goldenberg: Alberta’s oil should flow east, not west

Shipping oil to Asia? The route’s east, not west

Darryl Brown in Caribou – 2 Articles

The first article, East-West Maine highway may be privately built toll road, is from October 23 and announces Brown’s upcoming October 29 meetings in Aroostook County.  This provides a good outline of proponent talking points.

The second article, Proposed Highway To Bring Great Development, is from October 29.  It includes a video with many of Brown’s powerpoint slides, which are new.  One new selling point includes a multi-use recreation trail.  Also of note, the reporter says that MDOT was at the table.  This meeting was at Northern Maine Development Corporation, a subsidiary of Mobilize Maine.

There is a lot of information about Mobilize Maine and Eastern Maine Development Corporation in the Timeline of E/W Activity.  Although Mobilize Maine and the regional development corporations say that they promote “asset-based” development, the East-West Corridor is clearly not asset-based, but rather needs-based, i.e. to fill the “hollow middle.”

Democrat David Pearson and GOP Raymond Wallace vie for House District 24 seat

By Rachel Ohm | 10-11-12 | Morning Sentinel

Link to Original Article

A Democrat opposed to an east-west highway in northern Maine and an incumbent Republican who wants more information about the project’s impact are competing for a state Legislative seat to represent an area that includes Athens and Harmony.

 

 

Democrat David B. Pearson, 63, of Dexter, faces incumbent Republican Raymond Wallace, 67, also of Dexter, in the race for House District 24 seat, which Wallace has held since winning a special election in November. The other towns in the district are Charleston, Dexter, Garland and Ripley.

Pearson, who is town manager of Sangerville, said he would like to see the state focus on local development and good use of natural resources. He said he does not support a proposed east-west highway across Maine, but would like to support local agriculture and local development groups.

Wallace, who is retired from the Dexter Shoe Company, said he supports the Legislature’s recent decision to fund a $300,000 study to examine the viability of the proposed 220-mile privately financed highway that would run through the Piscataquis Valley from Calais to Coburn Gore.

“I want to see the study done to see what the effects would be,” he said. “We are in northern Penobscot County and it’s a little out of the way. It’s hard to get people to invest in central Maine.”

He also said that he is in favor of development and wouldn’t restrict development in the area.

“We are a developing state and we need to develop it,” he said, adding that towns should focus on turning old buildings into housing or new businesses.

Meanwhile, Pearson has chosen to focus on local agriculture as a way to create more jobs.

“We ship too much lumber out of the state,” he said. “It is very rarely sawed or made into products here. We have lobster and fish but not many processing plants. We have great natural resources and transportation costs are going up, so why not make them into something here?”

As vice chairman of the Dexter Regional Development Corporation, Pearson has also been involved with local development and is working on the Fossa General Store in Dexter, a year-round indoor farmers market that is tentatively scheduled to open this fall.

Wallace, in turn, has emphasized the development of small business, business regulations and benefits for workers. During his first year in the Legislature he was on the Committee of Labor, Commerce and Economic Development, where he worked on reforming worker’s compensation, made changes to unemployment policy that he said helped unemployed people return to work and reorganized the board of the Maine Housing Authority.

“This past year was a good learning year for me,” he said, noting that because he only served during the second session of a term he was unable to sponsor any bills.

Both candidates are focused on the future of Maine for young people and cited it as a motivation for running for office.

“We need to show them there’s a future,” Wallace said. “Right now young people in Maine have nothing in the future for them.”

According to Pearson, “I’d like to see Maine take a different direction, making it a place where people want to live and not just come because labor is cheap or there are resources.”

Rachel Ohm — 612-2368

rohm@mainetoday.com

E/W Alert! Drug Forfeiture May Lead to Seizure of Township 37

In 2009, there was a huge pot bust in Washington County.  Then just last week, federal prosecutors in Maine said that they may seize most of Township 37.  There is additional land in surrounding townships that may also be seized, pending the outcome of this case.

About 5 miles of this land goes along the Stud Mill Road, and lies dead on the proposed East-West Corridor route.

Here are links to several news stories:

Drug Forfeiture May Lead to Seizure of Township, Jay Field, MPBN

Documents show path that led to massive Maine pot bust, David Hench, Kennebec Journal

Man killed self days before he was to testify about pot farm, Judy Harrison, BDN

Big drug bust, high stakes in Down East Maine, Kevin Miller, Portland Press Herald

Four charged in 2009 Washington County pot bust, WCSH 6

Six Charged in Township 37 Marijuana Grow Case, DEA