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Slovenia adds water to constitution as fundamental right for all

by Agence France-Presse in Ljubljana

Slovenia has amended its constitution to make access to drinkable water a fundamental right for all citizens and stop it being commercialised.

With 64 votes in favour and none against, the 90-seat parliament added an article to the EU country’s constitution saying “everyone has the right to drinkable water”.

The centre-right opposition Slovenian Democratic party (SDS) abstained from the vote saying the amendment was not necessary and only aimed at increasing public support.

Slovenia is […]

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Water, climate, and the military tomorrow on “Corporations and Democracy” radio

Nick Buxton is tomorrow’s guest on “Corporations & Democracy” radio, streaming online on KZYX.org starting at 1 p.m. Pacific, 4 p.m. Eastern, and available after that at afdradio.org. Nick is co-editor of The Secure and the Dispossessed – How the military and corporations are seeking to shape a climate-changed world, published last year by Pluto Press. He’ll be talking about how big corporations and the military are already planning to maintain control in the face of the climate crisis. […]

Continue reading Water, climate, and the military tomorrow on “Corporations and Democracy” radio

Looking Back at the Cochabamba Water Revolt – 15 Years Ago

The Legacy and New Echoes of the Water War – 15 Years On

It is impossible to overstate the impact of the people’s victory in Cochabamba against Bechtel. At a time when winning real victories seemed like a distant dream, we suddenly saw that it was still possible to win, even against a giant U.S. multinational. That truth reverberated around the round, spreading hope and, most of all, courage, wherever it traveled. – Naomi Klein, author of This Changes […]

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Toxic Algal Blooms And Warming Waters: The Climate Connection

September 30, 2013

SAMMAMISH, Wash. — A photograph displayed in Jacki and John Williford’s home commemorates a camping trip that would go down in family history.

 

The most memorable event from that outing in 2011 involved the mussels John and his two children collected from a dock near Sequim Bay State Park on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. The family took them back to their campsite and steamed them in white wine with garlic and oregano.

 

“It was really good. […]

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Oregon, Washington issue Columbia River fish warning

Originally published September 23, 2013Health officials in Oregon and Washington said Monday that people should protect themselves against mercury and PCB contamination by limiting consumption of certain fish species from a 150-mile section of the Columbia River.

The Oregon Health Authority and the Washington Department of Health said people should eat no more than one meal a week of resident fish — those that live year-round in the same place — between Bonneville and […]

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Water compact: Klamath shows value of negotiation

Guest Editorial in Missoula, Montana

Michael Gale (Missoulian, Sept. 17) seems to think that events in Oregon’s Klamath Basin illustrate the danger of entering into a Flathead Reservation compact. Actually, the reverse is true.

Part of the problem is that Gale doesn’t really appear to know what happened on the Klamath. What actually happened is that the state of Oregon determined that the Klamath Tribes have a “time immemorial” right to in-stream flows on Klamath tributaries, which entitles them […]

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Ocean of Change: Changing chemistry of seawater poses lethal threat to marine life

Published: Sept. 22

 

Oregon fishermen tell stories of strange events on the Pacific Ocean that have made them shudder over the past half dozen years.

The Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery on the state’s north coast watched oyster larvae die en masse for three years in a row in the mid-2000s — depriving oyster farms along the entire West Coast of seed oysters.

[…]

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2013 Oregon drought calls for action on climate change

Posted: Sunday, September 22, 2013

Almost 2,000 feet deep, Crater Lake is the deepest body of water in the United States, a beautiful gem of southern Oregon. Fed by overhead snow and rain, the lake is one of the cleanest and purest in the world. Gazing upon the breathtakingly bright blue waters of the lake is something you never forget.

But there is trouble in paradise. During the past 21 […]

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Fate of Northern California at Stake in Trinity River War

September 16, 2013

Opinion

The Hoopa Valley Tribe applauds a recent decision by a federal judge to allow the federal Bureau of Reclamation to open the Lewiston dam and release Trinity River water needed to avoid a replay of the 2002 fish kill in the Klamath River.

The lifting of the restraining order holding back these flows, which was requested as part of a lawsuit by the Westlands Water District and San Lois & Delta-Mendota Water Authority, is good news […]

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Drought Driving New Water Deals in the West, Part One

Tony Barboza | 9/9/13 On a June morning, Scott White and a colleague from his agency, the state Water Resources Department, park their pickup near a green pasture and barn outside Bly, Ore. A rancher, his wife and son meet the government men at the gate, their faces tight with barely suppressed anger. Low snowpack and stream flows prompted Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber to declare a drought emergency in the Klamath Basin in April, and the watermasters are here […]

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