Forest Defender – A Tool for Understanding Your Rights

ForestDefender is a legal database that provides a snapshot of international human rights and obligations relevant to forest governance. It captures the large amount of information found from various sources and presents it in a way that is easily accessible to and usable by lawyers, activists and community members alike. –

See more at: http://forestdefender.org/#sthash.8UuPMfSN.dpuf

RCMP bombed oil site in ‘dirty tricks’ campaign

CBC News : Posted: Jan 30, 1999 11:08 AM ET

The Mounties bombed an oil installation as part of a dirty tricks campaign in their investigation into sabotage in the Alberta’s oil patch.

The revelation came at the bail hearing Thursday of two farmers who the Crown says have turned their complaints that oil industry pollution is making their families ill into acts of vandalism and mischief.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/rcmp-bombed-oil-site-in-dirty-tricks-campaign-1.188599

While America Spars Over Keystone XL, A Vast Network of Pipelines is Quietly Being Approved

BY KATIE VALENTINE ON MARCH 20, 2014   ClimateProgress

After countless marches, arrests, Congressional votes, and editorials, the five-and-a-half year battle over the controversial Keystone XL pipeline is nearing its end. If a recent ruling in Nebraska doesn’t delay the decision further, America could find out as soon as this spring whether or not the pipeline, which has become a focal point in America’s environmental movement, will be built.

But while critics and proponents of Keystone XL have sparred over the last few years, numerous pipelines — many of them slated to carry the same Canadian tar sands crude as Keystone — have been proposed, permitted, and even seen construction begin in the U.S. and Canada. Some rival Keystone XL in size and capacity; others, when linked up with existing and planned pipelines, would carry more oil than the 1,179-mile pipeline.

Read More: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/03/20/3254081/pipelines-you-havent-heard-of/#

 

NASA Study Concludes When Civilization Will End, And It’s Not Looking Good for Us

Tom McKay  March 18, 2014 , PolicyMic  

Civilization was pretty great while it lasted, wasn’t it? Too bad it’s not going to for much longer. According to a new study sponsored by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, we only have a few decades left before everything we know and hold dear collapses.

The report, written by applied mathematician Safa Motesharrei of the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center along with a team of natural and social scientists, explains that modern civilization is doomed. And there’s not just one particular group to blame, but the entire fundamental structure and nature of our society.  Read more:

http://policymic.com/articles/85541/nasa-study-concludes-when-civilization-will-end-and-it-s-not-looking-good-for-us

Judge voids ruling by Maine’s Aho in wind farm case, says it ‘had no rational basis’

Portland Press Herald, March 14, 2014,  Colin Woodard cwoodard@pressherald.com  Staff Writer

The court decision adds to criticism that the actions of Patricia Aho, Maine’s environmental chief, frequently benefit her former employer’s clients.

Patricia Aho, commissioner of the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, is the target of renewed criticism over regulatory action that benefited clients of her previous employer, the Pierce Atwood law firm, where she was a longtime industrial lobbyist.

Read More: http://www.pressherald.com/news/Judge_Maine_DEP_chief_Patricia_Aho_wind_case_overturns_decision.html?pagenum=1

Why surging water consumption could end the shale gale

BY ALEXIA LANE  , March 11, 2014

In an arid southern and central Texas, where once-fertile farmland used to dominate the landscape, a different kind of development has taken hold. Today one sees well pad after well pad after well pad, interspersed with the odd ranch. Following three consecutive years of drought, some agricultural operations have closed due to the lack of available freshwater. Despite this there has been a surge of unconventional natural gas drilling, with each well consuming millions of gallons of water. Locals are baffled – where is all this freshwater coming from?  READ MORE:

http://www.albertaoilmagazine.com/2014/03/finite-supply-shale-revolution/

 

 

New England on ‘High Alert’ After Canadian Pipeline Reversal Approved

Friday, March 7, 2014 by Common Dreams

The tar sands oil industry scored a regulatory victory on Thursday when the Canadian National Energy Board approved a plan by energy giant Enbridge to reverse the flow of Canada’s ‘Line 9’ oil pipeline eastward from Ontario to Montreal.

 

http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2014/03/07-4

Cambridge voters reject ordinance that would have blocked east-west corridor development

By Grace Lommel, Special to the BDN,  Posted March 06, 2014, at 12:32 p.m.

CAMBRIDGE, Maine — Voters rejected a proposed ordinance prohibiting land acquisition for transportation and distribution corridors within town boundaries by a vote of 63-29 at the annual town meeting on March 1. The ordinance would have blocked development of a proposed statewide east-west corridor through the Somerset County town.  Read more:

http://bangordailynews.com/2014/03/06/news/piscataquis/cambridge-voters-reject-ordinance-that-would-have-blocked-east-west-corridor-development/?ref=regionpiscataquis

Pipeline rupture report raises questions about TransCanada inspections

Feb 04, 2014 10:29 PM ET
Amber Hildebrandt, CBC News

A CBC News investigation has unearthed a critical report that the federal regulator effectively buried for several years about a rupture on a trouble-prone TransCanada natural gas pipeline.

On July 20, 2009, the Peace River Mainline in northern Alberta exploded, sending 50-metre-tall flames into the air and razing a two-hectare wooded area.

Members of Dene Tha’ First Nations community of Chateh, about 50 kilometres away from the site of the blast, also want to know why the report was not released until now.(Courtesy of Dene Tha’ First Nation)

 

 

Few people ever learned of the rupture — one of the largest in the past decade — other than the Dene Tha’ First Nation, whose traditional territory it happened on.