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Guest column: Deschutes should not be damaged for personal profit

Most Central Oregon residents are aware that the Deschutes River is severely compromised. However, the public is not getting all the information needed to make intelligent choices about the Deschutes River.

Some 90 percent of the water withdrawn from the Deschutes River is for irrigation. By comparison, all industry and municipal withdrawals amount to 5 percent. In other words, if the only withdrawals were for cities like Bend, the Deschutes would still be a functioning river.

As […]

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The KBRA killed the Klamath River

POSTED: 04/06/18, 11:08 PM PDT | UPDATED: 3 HRS AGO

I’m still livid over the March 29 Times-Standard deck head under the headline, “Salmon season likely to reopen” which read, “Hoopa tribe overharvested salmon by 10 times its share, agencies say.” Who determined the Hoopa Tribe’s “share”? The Hoopa Valley Tribe’s position has always been that the 80/20 allocation of in-river harvest, established by the Bureau of […]

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Peter DeFazio: Modernizing our Columbia River Treaty

By Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Peter DeFazio

Nearly 60 years ago, the people of British Columbia and the United States’ Pacific Northwest came together to craft a treaty that became an international model for sharing benefits across a trans-boundary river. Framers of the Columbia River Treaty crafted a long-term agreement but also recognized that a future generation would need to update the terms to address changing situations. That’s where we are today.

The treaty created value for both nations over […]

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Canada: Columbia River Treaty a boon to the U.S., but must benefit all (Guest opinion)

By Brandon Lee

Early in the new year, Canadian and American officials will meet to discuss the renewal of one of the most enduring examples of our strong partnership – the Columbia River Treaty.

Under the treaty’s terms, three dams and reservoirs in British Columbia, and one dam in Montana that floods the Kootenay Valley into B.C., provide flood protection and help generate hydroelectricity downstream in the United States.

For more than 50 years, this benefit-sharing agreement has reliably prevented […]

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EDITORIAL: Agriculture the most important use of water

Capital Press

November 23, 2017

When it comes to farming in the West, all you have to do is add water.

With water, the West has blossomed. Take a look at the vast Columbia Basin in Washington and the Snake River valley in southern Idaho. And the Central Valley in California. And all of Eastern Oregon.

Anywhere water is available, the predominant color is green, with high-value and high-yield crops dotting the countryside. Without water, the countryside is brown or […]

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UV, not filtration, should be used to protect Portland’s water (Guest opinion)

BY ERNEST ALAN MEYER

At Portland City Council, plans are being debated for treating water from the Bull Run watershed to prevent potentially human-infective cryptosporidium (crypto) oocysts from entering the Portland water supply. My research into treating water for crypto as a microbiology professor at Oregon Health & Science University may provide some insight that decision-makers can take into consideration.

Only two of the 15 known cryptosporidium species (there may be more) infect humans. These two specials can infect […]

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Protect our water: Oregonian Editorial

From its forested reservoir 25 miles east of Portland, the Bull Run system flows more than 200 million gallons of water daily into the city with minimal treatment and no filtration. It’s long been the only system in the nation that could make such a claim, a fact that’s been a point of […]

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Aerial spray ban best way to ensure clean water

By Justin Workman For The Register-Guard MARCH 27, 2017

Spring is upon us, inspiring images of flowers in colorful bloom. But for some in Oregon, it means the beginning of the spray season.

It’s a time when the big timber corporations such as Weyerhaeuser, Seneca, Roseburg and Giustina use helicopters to aerially spray cancerous concoctions of herbicides on their clearcuts. These timber companies are creating their own special spring shower that kills everything living except for newly replanted fir trees. […]

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Legislators need to find out why state lacks data on groundwater

Water’s a conflict-ridden subject in much of Eastern Oregon, especially the Klamath Basin. Anything that even faintly smells like it might restrict water rights, especially in rural agricultural areas, is in for a fight.

So it’s likely that a set of groundwater bills filed by a Beaverton state representative dealing with information and fees will be viewed with heavy suspicion if not outright opposition by those who depend on groundwater. That includes farmers and ranchers in the Basin.

The pressure […]

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Watershed restoration means clean drinking water for Oregonians (Opinion)

Print Email Guest Columnist By Guest Columnist Follow on Twitter on December 24, 2016 at 9:00 AM, updated December 24, 2016 at 9:01 AM Cathy Kellon

Oregonians care about their water for good reason. More than half of all Oregonians get their drinking water from rivers and streams and protecting the watersheds that provide that water is more important than ever. From summer droughts to a backlog of deferred maintenance on pipes and treatment plants, our towns face daunting challenges […]

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