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SW Oregon River Gets Special Protections With Designation

SALEM, Ore. (AP) – State officials have given a southwest Oregon river a special designation that could end an effort to build a nickel mine nearby.

The Statesman Journal reports (http://stjr.nl/2t26zW5) that Oregon’s Environmental Quality Commission voted 5-0 Thursday to designate the North Fork Smith River as an Outstanding Resource Waters.

The designation is part of the Clean Water Act that allows states to protect pristine waterbodies.

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality took public comments and supported the designation.

[…]

Continue reading SW Oregon River Gets Special Protections With Designation

Shortage forces Crater Lake to haul water

May 5, 2017

By Lee Juillerat for the Mail Tribune Despite an above-average snowpack, Crater Lake National Park is experiencing a water shortage.

Tanker trucks will begin hauling water to the park early next week after the Klamath Tribes called their water claim on the Wood River system, where the park normally gets its water supply. The tribes, which hold the most senior water right, called the claim to keep water in the streams after analyses showed flows in the […]

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Tribal chairman defends water call

CHILOQUIN —Don Gentry, chairman of the Klamath Tribal Council, isn’t shy about defending the water claims made by the Tribes to divert water on the Williamson and Sprague River systems in mid-April, nor in explaining the justification behind them.

The Klamath Tribes made the request for water to provide for maintenance of the streams and riparian areas and the lakes to provide for fish and other resources valuable to the Tribes, according to Gentry.

He sat down with the Herald […]

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California, Oregon farmers lost water in 2001; now they want to be paid

HERALD STAFFSat Jan 28th, 2017 6:51pm By Michael Doyle

McClatchy Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — Northern California and Oregon farmers who lost irrigation water in 2001 for the sake of fish are plunging into a climactic courtroom battle for tens of millions of dollars in compensation.

Years in the making, the trial set to start Monday in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims near the White House involves a lot of money, but that’s not all. For other Westerners, too, it […]

Continue reading California, Oregon farmers lost water in 2001; now they want to be paid

Court Decision May Mean California Owes Billions In Water Rights

AUBREY BETTENCOURT Executive Director, California Water Alliance 10:26 AM 01/13/2017

Within hours of the release of a potentially adverse federal court decision in late December, the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) extended by two months the open public comment period for consideration of its Bay-Delta Plan.

Elements of its plan include an uncompensated mandate to increase flows on several major California rivers by depriving long-established water-rights holders of access to their water. Now a federal court says the […]

Continue reading Court Decision May Mean California Owes Billions In Water Rights

Farmers score in battle over diverting Klamath River water for endangered species

BY MICHAEL DOYLE mdoyle@mcclatchydc.com

Northern California and Oregon irrigation districts have won a key round in a long-running legal battle as they seek compensation for their loss of water in the Klamath River Basin.

In a 53-page opinion, U.S. Court of Federal Claims Judge Marilyn Blank Horn concluded the federal government’s 2001 diversion of Klamath River Basin water amounted to a “physical taking” of the irrigation districts’ property. Horn’s ruling Wednesday rejected the government’s argument that the diversion instead amounted […]

Continue reading Farmers score in battle over diverting Klamath River water for endangered species

Get your own water, Oregon timber firm tells California town

By THOMAS FULLER The New York Times WEED, Calif. — The water that gurgles from a spring on the edge of Weed, a Northern California logging town, is so pristine that for more than a century it has been piped directly to the wooden homes spread across hills and gullies.

To the residents of Weed, which sits in the foothills of Mount Shasta, a snow-capped dormant volcano, the spring water is a blessing during a time of severe and prolonged […]

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Water shutoffs start in upper Basin

By LACEY JARRELL Herald & News Staff Reporter May 27, 2016

who receive water diversions from Fort Creek are experiencing the season’s first water shutoffs.

According to Oregon Water Resources Department (OWRD) Watermaster Tyler Martin, OWRD received a letter from the Klamath Tribes calling on their water rights on May 13.

The letter requested the department investigate stream flows at 13 upper Basin water monitoring stations. Martin said the only waterway that has been regulated is Fort Creek in Fort […]

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A Warming Climate Could Alter the Ecology of the Deepest Lake in the United States

Release Date: MAY 4, 2016 PORTLAND, Ore. — Warming air temperature is predicted to change water temperature and water column mixing in Oregon’s Crater Lake over the next several decades, potentially impacting the clarity and health of the iconic lake, according to a U.S. Geological Survey report released today.

Researchers from the USGS, University of Trento in Italy and Crater Lake National Park analyzed how climate conditions currently affect the fundamental temperature characteristics and water-column mixing processes in Crater Lake, […]

Continue reading A Warming Climate Could Alter the Ecology of the Deepest Lake in the United States

Undamming this major U.S. river is opening a world of possibility for native cultures and wildlife

May 4, 2016

“The run of salmon in the Klamath River this year is the heaviest it has ever known. There are millions of fish below the falls near Keno, and it is said that a man with a gaff could easily land a hundred of the salmon in an hour, in fact they could be caught as fast as a man could pull them in.”

—Klamath Falls Evening Herald front page on Sept. 24, 1908.

Flowing over 250 miles […]

Continue reading Undamming this major U.S. river is opening a world of possibility for native cultures and wildlife