Poland Springs: What it Means to be Exploited

H2O comes at a price for both our health and the environment

By: Alexa Coppola

On any given day in the progressive 21st century, a relatively intuitive economist might ask himself, “What may be the next most valuable commodity?”A greedy economist without regard for the environment or for his fellow citizens of the planet would tell you that water may be next in line for items of greatest value.Water — yes, water. The same water that runs through the tap when you pull the lever on the sink upwards, or turn the knob of a faucet. Not water that is “purified” or somehow better because it has come prepackaged, cleaner, merely because it comes in a bottle.

The exploitation of water is an issue that is becoming more urgent with every passing day. This can be attributed to enormous water bottle corporations essentially stealing water from communities and selling it back to us.

And these are not communities in some far off, unreachable land; they are towns in places like Maine and Colorado, who have reservoirs for tap water just like any town might.

A water bottle corporation will go into these towns, purchase a small plot of land for the bare minimum price, and basically use this land to claim entire bodies of water.

This water will be neatly packaged and sold back to the community who is supposed to have access to clean water sources. Now, the only sources they’ll have are wrapped in a thin layer of plastic and purchased at the grocery store.

This works so tremendously well because the bottles are sold everywhere to people who have no idea that this water theft phenomenon is even occurring.

And it doesn’t help that these corporate water giants literally reverse the harmful facts of wasteful water bottle usage to deter from the negative attention it would naturally create.

Poland Spring is a prime example, who’s advertisements tell us that their drinking water comes from the natural springs of Maine. But whose natural springs are we drinking from, exactly?

Poland Spring, Aquafina and Dasani all find their origins in public water sources, which means that the water you’re paying for is pretty much the exact same water that runs from the tap.

There are few exceptions. One exception is that the water from your tap isn’t stolen from an unassuming town. Another is that the water coming from your tap comes straight from the area’s reservoir.

Who knows what the water went through before it was bottled? Probably not the person drinking it. It is also confined within a plastic bottle, which contains innumerable hazardous and harmful chemicals.

But this is controversial subject matter for another day.

It is true that this is shocking information that can impact the daily lives of many of us, but there are certainly measures we can take to stop this exploitation and robbery from occurring.

We can cease purchasing bottled water and instead carry our own reusable water bottles. Fewer sales of these useless items will result in less demand for them, and less need for their supply.

These are small steps, but it is the small measures taken by many individuals that equal the big steps that are necessary for the sustenance of our society.

link to original article: http://www.themontclarion.org/archives/3738832

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