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Supreme Court won’t consider Western farmers’ water fight

June 22, 2020

Jeremy P. Jacobs, E&E News

The Supreme Court today declined to consider whether federal regulators violated farmers’ constitutional rights when they cut off irrigation water to save fish in the Pacific Northwest.

Facing drought in 2001, the George W. Bush administration shut off water deliveries from the Bureau of Reclamation’s Klamath River project to farms in south-central Oregon and Northern California. The goal was to provide water to threatened salmon species downriver.

The farmers revolted. They […]

Continue reading Supreme Court won’t consider Western farmers’ water fight

OP ED: Republicans say Supreme Court must prevent uncompensated theft of Western water

June 18. 2020

The Fifth Amendment protects the right to life, liberty, and property. This week, the Supreme Court should take a critical step to protect the private property rights of farmers and ranchers in the Western states. Their rights were infringed upon by a lower court ruling that upended the water laws of the region and abandoned over a century of federal deference to state law for adjudicating and administering water rights.

The Supreme Court is considering whether to […]

Continue reading OP ED: Republicans say Supreme Court must prevent uncompensated theft of Western water

EPA report: Dams play large role in raising water temperatures

Study issued Tuesday looks at causes of warming water on Snake and Columbia rivers

By Eric Barker, of the Tribune

May 20, 2020 Updated 1 hr ago

The Environmental Protection Agency issued a report Tuesday detailing summertime water temperature problems on the lower Snake and Columbia rivers and assigning significant responsibility to federal dams.

The report said dams on both rivers play a role in raising water temperatures above 68 degrees — the state water quality standards of Washington […]

Continue reading EPA report: Dams play large role in raising water temperatures

Calif. greenlights massive Klamath River dam removal

Jeremy P. Jacobs, E&E News reporter

Greenwire: Thursday, April 9, 2020

The largest dam removal project in U.S. history came one step closer to fruition this week, as California issued permits for breaching the four dams on the Klamath River.

The State Water Resources Control Board issued a Clean Water Act certification and environmental assessment for the proposal to remove three dams in Northern California and one in southern Oregon.

“Decades in the making, this historic and comprehensive […]

Continue reading Calif. greenlights massive Klamath River dam removal

Proposed dam removal on Oregon-California border stirs debate over coveted water

By Gillian Flaccus | The Associated Press March 29, 2020

KLAMATH, Calif. — The second-largest river in California has sustained Native American tribes with plentiful salmon for millennia, provided upstream farmers with irrigation water for generations and served as a haven for retirees who built dream homes along its banks.

With so many competing demands, the Klamath River has come to symbolize a larger struggle over the increasingly precious water resources of the […]

Continue reading Proposed dam removal on Oregon-California border stirs debate over coveted water

Satellite data boosts understanding of climate change’s effects on kelp

Steve Lundeberg, steve.lundeberg@oregonstate.edu Mar 5, 2020 Tapping into 35 years of satellite imagery, researchers at Oregon State University have dramatically enlarged the database regarding how climate change is affecting kelps, near-shore seaweeds that provide food and shelter for fish and protect coastlines from wave damage.

And the Landsat pictures paved the way to some surprising findings: A summer of warm water isn’t automatically bad news for kelps, and large winter waves aren’t either.

The study was published in Ecology.

[…]

Continue reading Satellite data boosts understanding of climate change’s effects on kelp

Oregon looks upstream to the lower Snake River

PASCO, Wash. — Oregon Gov. Kate Brown shifted the political debate from cap and trade during the short-session in Salem to the waters of the Columbia River’s largest tributary — the Snake River — and the four lower dams on the Eastern Washington portion of it.

Brown on Feb. 11 wrote a letter to Washington Gov. Jay Inslee expressing her support to remove the earthen portions from the four concrete lower Snake River dams.

She stated the science was clear […]

Continue reading Oregon looks upstream to the lower Snake River

Ocean acidification is impacting Dungeness crabs, Oregon’s most-notable fishery, stare reveals

January 25, 2020 Invest Records

Other folks that produce their living on the waters off the Oregon circulate contain prolonged acknowledged that ocean acidification is a area. As carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean, it becomes extra acidic and carbonate ions, which many crustaceans utilize to manufacture their shells, turn into scarce.

Between 2006 and 2008, the Whiskey Creek Hatchery on Netarts Bay seen Continue reading Ocean acidification is impacting Dungeness crabs, Oregon’s most-notable fishery, stare reveals

Court orders EPA to write temperature control plans for Columbia, Snake

By GEORGE PLAVEN Capital Press Dec 27, 2019

A federal appeals court has ordered the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to finalize a long-overdue plan to lower water temperatures for endangered fish in the Columbia and Snake rivers.

The ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals is likely to intensify the ongoing debate over breaching four Lower Snake River dams in Eastern Washington to increase salmon and steelhead runs.

Environmental and commercial fishing groups sued the EPA […]

Continue reading Court orders EPA to write temperature control plans for Columbia, Snake

Oregon, California fishery rebounds in conservation ‘home run’

Friday, December 27, 2019 6:58am

By Gillian Flaccus

The Associated Press

WARRENTON, Ore. — A rare environmental success story is unfolding in waters off Oregon and California.

After years of fear and uncertainty, bottom trawler fishermen — those who use nets to scoop up rockfish, bocaccio, sole, Pacific Ocean perch and other deep-dwelling fish — are making a comeback in Oregon and California, reinventing themselves as a sustainable industry less than two decades after authorities closed huge […]

Continue reading Oregon, California fishery rebounds in conservation ‘home run’